Lunar Rover Uncovered A Strange Substance On The Moon That Experts Are Struggling To Explain

By Joe Kozlowski
Boredom Therapy Staff

Space may be the final frontier, but it's also something that we're all superficially familiar with. While you might not know the mineral composition of an asteroid or the exact size of the Milky Way, everyone knows the basic order of things. Jupiter is the biggest planet, Mercury is the closest to the sun, and we're living on a rock somewhere in between.

But sometimes that natural order is subverted by a monumental find. In fact, a lunar rover scouring the surface of the moon recently discovered a strange substance amidst the familiar rocks and dust that seemed completely out of place.

People aren't going to the moon lately, but scientists are still scouring its surface for clues about the universe. In fact, China launched Yutu-2, an unmanned lunar rover, in December 2018.

After landing on the dark side of the moon, Yutu-2 started tracking across the lunar surface. It constantly snapped pictures along the way, hoping to capture evidence of anything that could be scientifically significant.

Scientists would eagerly examine each photo after it was beamed back to Earth, but they never spotted anything unusual. The rover needed to "nap" each day, however, giving them some time for extra analysis.

The Independent

During the rover's down time, each photo was analyzed down to the smallest detail. As usual, scientists just saw a great deal of dust. But in one photo, something abnormal stood out.

As you might imagine, the moon's surface is pretty plain. While there are plenty of ridges and craters, there isn't a great deal of color variation; just about everything is the same shade of dusty gray.

In one photo, however, there was a small glint of light. Something was shining at the bottom of a crater. The scientists were perplexed; nothing on the moon should naturally be reflective...

Chinese Lunar Exploration Project